Avoid A Total Bankruptcy Following These Guidelines

With the ongoing economical turmoil in the world, more and more people are considering personal bankruptcy as a viable option. It can be the only way to hold on to your home, car and other valuables. Sometimes, it is the only lifeline you have. The following article will explain personal bankruptcy and the options it may hold for you.

One you realize you are in financial trouble and have decided to file for personal bankruptcy you should move quickly. Waiting to the last minute to file bankruptcy can cause a number of issues. You may face negative repercussions such as wage or bank account garnishment or foreclosure on your home. You can also not leave time enough for a thorough review of your financial situation, which will limit your available options.

When it comes time for you to hire an attorney to deal with your bankruptcy, be sure to find one that has a ton of experience with personal bankruptcy. Learn about the charges you will have to pay, and how many of their associates will be working on your case.

Find out what the homestead exemption limit is in your state before filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy. If you have too much equity in your home to qualify for the exemption, you could lose your house in the bankruptcy. You can’t change your mind once you’ve begun the process, so make sure you will be able to keep your home before you file.

Know what debts can be forgiven. You may hear that you have to pay a certain debt, and that it cannot be discharged, but that information will usually be coming from a bill collector. Student loans and child support and a few other debts cannot be discharged, but most others can.

Educate yourself about the bankruptcy process. You can increase your knowledge of the bankruptcy process by conversing with a bankruptcy attorney or by carrying out independent research on the internet. Whichever method you chose to increase your knowledge of the bankruptcy process, it is vital that you comprehend how filing for bankruptcy will affect yourself, your family and your creditors.

Remember that certain kinds of debt won’t be discharged even after you have filed for bankruptcy. If you have outstanding student loans, owe child or spousal support, a divorce settlement agreement, or unpaid taxes, you will still be liable for these debts. Also, if you forget to list certain debts on your court documents, you won’t be able to add them in the future.

Be prepared to complete some mandatory courses. When you file for bankruptcy, the court will require that you successfully complete two mandatory courses, a credit counseling course and a debtor education course. Both of these courses can be completed online for a nominal fee, and while they are not too difficult, it is important that you are prepared for them.

If you have a credit card with your local credit union, it may be one that does not have to be given up due to bankruptcy. Check with your credit union to find out if the line of credit will continue after the bankruptcy is final. You still must be sure to include it on your application with your other debts.

Filing for Chapter 13 bankruptcy will not prevent auto loans or mortgages from being obtained. However, it will be a longer and more arduous task. Your trustee can help you acquire a new loan. When meeting with the trustee, bring a budget which shows that you will be able to afford the payment on the loan you are trying to get. An explanation of need will also be necessary.

As noted earlier, the current economic climate keeps more people in a constant state of struggle, and many of them are turning to bankruptcy. If you decide that this option is the best one for you, hopefully this article has provided you with helpful guidance you can use to face your financial future and make positive changes.

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